Vote For The League

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The League team has joined forces with a few friends to pitch three amazing panels to SXSW 2020, and we want your vote.

SXSW is a set of film, music and interactive media conferences and festivals held every March in Austin, Texas. The conference is over 30 years old, and since 1987, the festival has grown both in terms of attendance and influence. SXSW is one of the most important gatherings on the nation's entertainment calendar. In 2019, the SXSW Conference & Festivals, SXSW EDU, and SXSW Gaming drew attendance totaling approximately 417,400.

Now through Friday, August 23, members of the SXSW Community are invited to vote on submitted panels. That’s where you come in! There are two ways you can help. 1) Visit our panel pages below and vote up by 8/23! 2) Help us spread the word by sharing our panels on social media!

Panel #1: How Not To Fake Woke

Interactive Track: Advertising & Brand Engagement
For Advertising Professionals • Brand Managers • Influencers • Marketing Strategists 

Featuring:  
Tracy Sturdivant, CEO, The League
Mikhael Tara Garver, Founder and Experiential Architect, 13EXP and MTG
Ashley Spillane, Founder and President, Impactual
Grant Garrison, Communications Leader, Global Community Impact, Johnson & Johnson

Today, there is a cultural expectation that brands do more than sell goods and services, but that they do good. As consumer trust and creative effectiveness continue to wane, brands are increasingly relying upon external validators to appear “woke.” But woe to those who “fake woke”, according to Cannes Lion 2019. However well-intended, attempts at social good creative don’t always land with consumers. This panel brings together experts in social impact design, social justice strategists, leaders in experiential and immersive design, and influencer engagement to help marketers and creative strategists achieve real impact, be better civic engagement partners, and drive your bottom line.


Panel #2: The Winning Formula: What Does It Take To Make A Good Social Impact Film?

Film: Making Film & Episodics
For People Working in Social Impact • Filmmakers • Organizers

Featuring:
Marjan Safinia, Director & Producer, Department of Expansion
Nse Ufot, Executive Director, New Georgia Project

In a polarized America, where demographics are rapidly shifting and the dual forces of white supremacy and patriarchy threaten to further erode our democracy, women of color are making history by claiming political power for the communities they represent. Filmed through the 2018 election cycle into 2019, the “And She Could Be Next” docuseries follows a dynamic slate of history-making candidates. Made by a team of women filmmakers of color, the docuseries asks whether democracy itself can be preserved and strengthened by those most marginalized. In this session, we’ll explore how an authentic, creative, and comprehensive social impact campaign can take a film’s critical message and ensure it reaches the masses.


Panel #3: Who's Electable Anyway?


Convergence: Government & Politics Track
For Potential Candidates For Public Office • Political Strategists • Funders • 2020 Voters

Featuring:
Glynda Carr, Executive Director, Higher Heights for America
Jessica L. Byrd, Founder, Three Point Strategies

“Electability” has been both a buzzword and a running theme of contemporary political conversations, but it obscures a simple truth: the candidates we decide to vote for are the candidates who are “electable.” As we approach the height of the 2020 Election cycle, our panelists will provide in-the-moment analysis on the impact of “electability”, “likability” and unconscious bias on voting, fundraising, and raising the visibility of candidates who represent the full spectrum of identities and ideas in the U.S. This panel explores the truth about “electability”: whether it is a valid conversation in the 2020 elections (plural); what the data says; who the conversation harms and benefits; and how it muddies our view of effective governance, collective power, and the security of the ballot.